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Rosetta Goodkind 1917-2011
Alumna and Pre-College Faculty Member

Rosetta Goodkind, a member of the Pre-College faculty for 22 years, died on July 8 in Philadelphia at 94. She was predeceased by her husband, Robert Klotz. Born February 3, 1917, Goodkind attended Hunter College and got her diploma from the Institute of Musical Art before it merged with Juilliard. She also studied education methods at the Juilliard Graduate School, where she received a full scholarship and graduated in 1938. Goodkind taught at Juilliard as early as 1941 and was briefly on what were then called the Regular and Special faculties; she joined the Pre-College faculty in the fall of 1946. Goodkind left Juilliard in 1969 to chair the pre-college piano department of the Manhattan School of Music. Jonathan Feldman, chair of Juilliard’s collaborative piano department, reminisces about her.

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My relationship with Rosetta Goodkind began in 1962. I started my piano studies with her at Juilliard’s preparatory department (now the Pre-College) when I was 10 years old and worked with her there for six years. While she then went to the Manhattan School of Music and I continued my education at Juilliard, Rosetta was to remain one of the strongest influences of my musical education.

Through the teaching of her mentor, Juilliard faculty member Carl Roeder, Rosetta instilled two very important concepts into my playing. She showed me the importance of releasing, which is the basis of playing without tension. The second concept was being able to utilize this “freedom” in making musical decisions—to deliberately express oneself musically without physical strain. Roeder called these concepts “liberation and deliberation.”  I had no idea then what a profound effect this would have on me throughout my career as a pianist. 

Rosetta’s passion for her art and her devotion to her students were exemplary. She was such an important part of my life, and I am extremely fortunate to have had her as a mentor.

It is the mark of great teaching that a student learns long after the lessons end. Rosetta was such a teacher: her legacy and spirit continue to live within me.

—Jonathan Feldman

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